Adding suffix to your name

ERDoc

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Its OK, you don't have to put your body type lol.
918d655126dc73135aa04b5193957dcb.jpg
 

luke_31

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I still love when I see medics in my area sign with "MICP". That is not our job title (no where in my area of SoCal uses Mobile Intensive Care Paramedics) and the ones I have seen use it do not have any critical care training or experience.
Only MICP I still know of is Dr. Baxtor Larmon but he's real old school LA county medic from back when that was their actual title.
 

wilderness911

paramedic student
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Wilderness911, 6.279"

That usually takes care of things. Never bring a knife to a gunfight...
 

TransportJockey

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I could be wrong, but I think a state (maybe New Jersey?) has MICPs.
Texas medics could theoretically push for it, since a medic unit is state designated as a MICU unit.
 

chaz90

Community Leader
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Alaska uses the MICP designation for their paramedics. I think they still use EMT I-III just to be different too.
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
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Courtesy of the NREMT official Facebook page

Usually, all professional credentials are listed in the order they were earned. For example, all of the following are correct:
Not quite... it should be (for the US):

1. Highest degree in the discipline presenting
2. Highest degree in other disciplines
3. Licenses then major certifications in order of relevance to discipline presenting in communication!

Typically, try to limit to 3 or less of the most relevent post nominals (particularly outside of academia/professional organizations) but there are times that maybe should be exceptions to that rule... RNs love their post nominals for example. RNs also have a unconventional habit of listing their RN before anything else, which is not the accepted style for US academia.

So lets say Mr. Nur Smedic has MBA BSN ASN MSN NRP CCRN CFRN RN

If they are the director of an ambulance service, then they would sign the email to their state professional organization:
Nur Smedic, MBA, MSN, RN, NRP, CFRN, CCRN
Or a business card:
Nur Smedic, MBA, MSN, NRP

But if they are a flight nurse then they would be presented at a CE conference:
Nur Smedic, MSN, MBA, RN, CFRN, CCRN, NRP
Or on a business card:
Nur SMedic, MSN, RN, CFRN

There is also a US school of academic style that would shift the non-discipline degrees to the end. Please note that these conventions vary by country.

In the hospital environment, it is common to stack post nominals in your premade email sigline, so I do. But, I never sign RN after my name on any charts or paperwork...
 
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Pond Life

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How should 2 x MSc be written?
wondered for a while but no one has given me good advise yet?
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
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How should 2 x MSc be written?
wondered for a while but no one has given me good advise yet?
The proper way in the UK is not so familiar to me... but here it goes:

Do you have bachelors? (those first... unless they were integral in the MSc then omit the BSc) Are they from the same institution? If so, not spaces and group by uni. So say you went to King's College for your BSc and one MSc, while you got your other MSc from University of Queensland (put non UK degrees last last)

Pond Life, BSc MSc KCL, MSc Queensland

But don't forget to list your religious orders, civil and military honours first...
 

Pond Life

Forum Crew Member
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One MSc is Cardiology from Sussex and the other MSc is Advanced Healthcare Practice from Peninsula Medical School. Both UK and I went straight to them bypassing the BSc pathway.
Until now I've only written Pond Life MSc, PgDip and left the other MSc out of the loop totally as I thought it looked daft writing MSc., MSc., PgDip
cheers for your help
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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Right after I completed my MBA I read an article from a recruiter that stated that he'd toss resumes that placed "MBA" after their names because that was bragging and not a professional designation (along with BSc, BA, etc). Yes you can be proud but do it on your own time and not as advertising.
Forgive my bluntness, but that recruiter is an idiot. For every retard that does that, 10 will look at the resume because they know you have already earned your MBA, and will trash your resume if you don't have MBA in the top line. They don't want to have to search to see if you have your MBA, they want to look at it and know instantly if you have one.

Personally, I only list my "suffixes" in my formal email signature, for work.

On a resume, I don't list it as a suffix, but I will list where I obtained my education. but that's just a personal preference.
 

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