Secondary career suggestions

Luke472

Forum Ride Along
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Hello, very informative site. Glad I found it as you guys/gals have a tremendous amount of experience and are very much well respected in my views. First and foremost, EMS/health related is not my primary profession. I work in a large busy metropolitan law enforcement agency and have been here for a little over 29 years. Approximately 15 years ago, I became involved in our tactical team as an ancillary duty to my primary job at my department. My primary role was just a grunt tactical team member. About 7 years ago, I joined our tactical medical team after obtaining my AEMT on the side at a community college. Most recently about 3 years ago, I sought and obtained my Paramedic certification. I ride on local EMS units and work in neighboring ED's in an attempt to stay fresh with my skills and maintain patient contact. With this, I humbly "do not" consider myself a real "medic for obvious reasons. I obtained my latest certification to have a better understanding of the pathophysiology of medicine etc. I thoroughly enjoyed my clinical in the ED and continue to enjoy that side of the health component. I'm not finding myself at a crossroads with retirement and considering continuing on to become an RN or something else in the health field. My concern and I've read some posts that indicate all ages find themselves in schools of this type and that at all junctures of life. Does anyone have any first hand experience of transitioning into an RN role later in life (in the 50's)? I open to any and all suggestions as to how better direct my post career and no better place than to ask real professionals who do this day in and out.
 

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
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I know people who went the route of RN, PA, Ambulance Paramedic, even MD... many have started in their 50s, or as post retirement jobs. It's even easier, since you have a pension from the PD, you don't have young kids anymore (maybe), and you are able to make the full time educational commitment. It all depends on what you want to do.
 
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Luke472

Forum Ride Along
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DrParasite, thanks for taking the time to make a comment. I'm researching some options.
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
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There are plenty of people that become nurses in their 50s.

If you choose to go the nursing route understand that nursing school is very much a generalist education and you will spend a large amount of time with non-critical care patients. The floor clinicals destroy the soul.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
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I would absolutely pursue becoming an RN if I were in your shoes.

Lots of people become nurses later in life. The best students in my EMT classes were the non-traditional students.

Go back to community college later in life to pursue a rewarding career and expand my knowledge? Sign me up.
 

OceanBossMan263

Forum Crew Member
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My uncle did it. Retired in 2001 after 20 years on PD, about 5 years later attended the local community College for ADN. Being a male and former police officer, he quickly found work in psych. Having moved south, he ended up taking travel contracts to come back up to NY.

If you want to see more of the country and get paid to do it, travel nursing would be a good bet
 

FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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Hello, very informative site. Glad I found it as you guys/gals have a tremendous amount of experience and are very much well respected in my views. First and foremost, EMS/health related is not my primary profession. I work in a large busy metropolitan law enforcement agency and have been here for a little over 29 years. Approximately 15 years ago, I became involved in our tactical team as an ancillary duty to my primary job at my department. My primary role was just a grunt tactical team member. About 7 years ago, I joined our tactical medical team after obtaining my AEMT on the side at a community college. Most recently about 3 years ago, I sought and obtained my Paramedic certification. I ride on local EMS units and work in neighboring ED's in an attempt to stay fresh with my skills and maintain patient contact. With this, I humbly "do not" consider myself a real "medic for obvious reasons. I obtained my latest certification to have a better understanding of the pathophysiology of medicine etc. I thoroughly enjoyed my clinical in the ED and continue to enjoy that side of the health component. I'm not finding myself at a crossroads with retirement and considering continuing on to become an RN or something else in the health field. My concern and I've read some posts that indicate all ages find themselves in schools of this type and that at all junctures of life. Does anyone have any first hand experience of transitioning into an RN role later in life (in the 50's)? I open to any and all suggestions as to how better direct my post career and no better place than to ask real professionals who do this day in and out.
I'm working my last few years at the FD going to RN and then hopefully NP school, this is my path.. I spent the last 10 years piecing together college classes to earn a bachelors and then the pre-reqs for RN school and am currently in my RN classes now. I'm now 40 going through class and hope to retire from the FD by 45..
 

Carlos Danger

Forum Deputy Chief
Premium Member
4,111
2,812
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Hello, very informative site. Glad I found it as you guys/gals have a tremendous amount of experience and are very much well respected in my views. First and foremost, EMS/health related is not my primary profession. I work in a large busy metropolitan law enforcement agency and have been here for a little over 29 years. Approximately 15 years ago, I became involved in our tactical team as an ancillary duty to my primary job at my department. My primary role was just a grunt tactical team member. About 7 years ago, I joined our tactical medical team after obtaining my AEMT on the side at a community college. Most recently about 3 years ago, I sought and obtained my Paramedic certification. I ride on local EMS units and work in neighboring ED's in an attempt to stay fresh with my skills and maintain patient contact. With this, I humbly "do not" consider myself a real "medic for obvious reasons. I obtained my latest certification to have a better understanding of the pathophysiology of medicine etc. I thoroughly enjoyed my clinical in the ED and continue to enjoy that side of the health component. I'm not finding myself at a crossroads with retirement and considering continuing on to become an RN or something else in the health field. My concern and I've read some posts that indicate all ages find themselves in schools of this type and that at all junctures of life. Does anyone have any first hand experience of transitioning into an RN role later in life (in the 50's)? I open to any and all suggestions as to how better direct my post career and no better place than to ask real professionals who do this day in and out.
If you are serious about doing “something” In healthcare, RN is probably the best bang for your investment of time and money. Some parts of the country you basically need a BSN to get a “good” job; in other areas this isn’t the case. Tons of good opportunities in nursing.

I was in my 20’s working full time as a HEMS paramedic when I went to school for my ASN and later my BSN, but I was just a month shy of my 40th birthday (with a family in tow) when I finished my grad degree in Nurse Anesthesiology, as one of the oldest in my class.

There‘s no question that going back to school when you are a little older is harder (as most things are) than when you are in your 20’s, but for a smart, motivated person (like it sounds you are), it is more than doable. And if it’s what you really want to do, I think you are probably much more likely that not to be glad you did it. There will certainly be days that you question why you chose to do that instead of spending your days fly fishing or golfing, but if you need or want to work, nursing is a solid choice.

Another option is to make a second career in EMS as a paramedic? EMS is a tough field to make a good living in most areas, but if you are OK financially and just doing it to stay busy, it might be a good way to go.
 

Jambow

Forum Probie
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Totally agree - RN is totally doable- go for it, Im in my early 40's and doing the same thing
my 10 year plan is to finish CRNA school
There are many possibilities for nurses im sure you know.
Just for variety - here are a few other health jobs that are about the same amount of school
Respiratory Therapy
Nuclear Medical Technologist - pay$$$ in my area
X-ray tech - never met an unhappy x-ray tech
if you already have a Bachelors
PA school
 

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