Looking to get fit. Tips please

DragonClaw

Forum Crew Member
41
2
8
I'm getting ready to start classes and let's put it simply. I'm a stick. I'm no longer in shape.

I'm 5'4 and about 102. I have trouble lifting 50 lb bags of feed (or anything that weight, really).

I need to do cardio.

I work 40+ hours at a call center. I have weekends off and usually Fridays.

Recommendations?
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
262
132
43
Cardio won't build strength (not in a substantial way), which isn't to say it isn't valuable. Strength is built by resistance training.

Your going to hear a bunch of theories from a bunch of different people. My personal advice would be to find a personal trainer and a registered dietitian who can help you find a plan that actually works for you. I think finding someone who will emphasis good technique is critical, poor technique not only prevents building strength but also can lead to devastating injuries (which are even more likely to occur with beginners who don't have good technique or know where their limits are).

To me cardio is for cardio (I love swimming, rowing, and the stair master) and lifting is for strength. I do like exercises that work multiple groups at the same time like dead lifts and clean and jerks, but these can also be dangerous and can't be the only part of a strength program. I've also been lifting since I played football in high school so I've found what works well for me and where my limits are at.

I don't personally like cross fit or any other "functional fitness," while there are some some people in those communities who are excellent there are in my opinion even more who don't know what they are doing and encourage dangerous behaviors. I know many people who have achieved great results through these programs so I don't think that they are without merit, but I'm a bit hesitant to recommend them.

I would also be cautious of supplements unless they are recommended by a registered dietitian or someone else who has real, good, experience (and on that note, nutritionist is not a protected title the US, if they call themselves a nutritionist look elsewhere). Even something as simple as eating too much protein can wreck havoc on your body and cause permanent damage, and there is only so much of certain nutrients you body needs (the rest typically damages your liver or kidneys on the way out).
 

DragonClaw

Forum Crew Member
41
2
8
Oh yeah, I know can cardio isn't really going to help me all too much with just lifting, if it all. Breathe better, more oxygen probaby but yeah.

I guess it's a little sad (boo hoo, I know) when I tell people I want to be a cop one day or I'm working toward my EMT basic. And they just give you that look of doubt. Kind of a cringe. And you know they don't believe you for a second, not that you want to, but that you will or can.

And I know why. I'm not stupid. I'm not even normal weight. I just need to start somewhere and at this point, it's on me. I'll be looking into that, and I don't usually supplement. I used to run in high school (nothing big, but I wasn't out of shape), but I fell out of practice.

I just know I can't be an EMT when I struggle with smaller things.
 

Gurby

Forum Asst. Chief
761
530
93
Start lifting ASAP. Forget cardio - You need to be able to lift 100 pounds minimum to do this job IMO... Preferably be able to lift a lot more than that if you want to not injure yourself while moving patients around.

If you want to be a cop, start training wrestling and Brazilian Jiu Jitsu too. Have that be your cardio. I think all cops should train a grappling martial art, but you especially need to make up for your size somehow.
 

Virgil

Forum Crew Member
36
5
8
Start a program and stick to it. Don't bother trying to find the "perfect" one, all that matters is consistency.

The ideal program for you would have linear progression, incorporate muscle groups 3x a week and keep it varying enough so you don't get bored.

Try pic related, you'll adjust to it accordingly and just please remember not to overload yourself. I.E., don't lift more than you can handle. If it's just the bar? That's okay. I could barely lift the bar and 10's when I first started.

Edit: Those AMRAP's will have you huffing and puffing for sure. I also usually incorporate some swimming during the week, but have no desire to be an icicle so I'm waiting a little longer:D
 

Attachments

Canadiangoose

Forum Ride Along
5
0
1
I'm getting ready to start classes and let's put it simply. I'm a stick. I'm no longer in shape.

I'm 5'4 and about 102. I have trouble lifting 50 lb bags of feed (or anything that weight, really).

I need to do cardio.

I work 40+ hours at a call center. I have weekends off and usually Fridays.

Recommendations?
Do something you enjoy and that you already have equipment for. You could start walking and find a half marathon schedule to train up to a half marathon. Enter a race or a sporting event 5k, 10k etc and build your way up. You could take public transit to work (if possible) and walk part the way there. Work out videos. Apps to work out.

I am trying to lose weight after an injury and I am trying to get in shape too. I started a walking club that meets every other week.
 

Canadiangoose

Forum Ride Along
5
0
1
Do something you enjoy and that you already have equipment for. You could start walking and find a half marathon schedule to train up to a half marathon. Enter a race or a sporting event 5k, 10k etc and build your way up. You could take public transit to work (if possible) and walk part the way there. Work out videos. Apps to work out.

I am trying to lose weight after an injury and I am trying to get in shape too. I started a walking club that meets every other week.
It helps to have a work out buddy too!
 

DragonClaw

Forum Crew Member
41
2
8
Any particular exercise for lifting? The coursework I'm doing says 50 by my self, 150 team minimum.

Edit: Weight per course requirments.
 
Last edited:

DrParasite

The fire extinguisher is not just for show
4,507
984
113
Last I checked our job performance requirements, it was 125 solo, and 250 with a partner. I think....

Reality point: you need to be able to lift heavy objects in their industry. While it's 75% technique, it's still 25% muscle. You don't need to be a body builder, but you need some muscles.

Pushups are great, bench press is great, squats are great, bicep curls are great, leg presses are great. Do what you can.

If you want to join a gym, go for it. You can get a personal trainer, but they tend to be pricey. just work your muscles. Don't do more than you can handle, but push your limits. I always preferred working out with a buddy, but that's just me.

No one can give you weight requirements, because it's your body. If I tell you that you should be able to bench press 135 (which is the bar and one plate on each side), I don't want you to get hurt because you can't do it yet, and then it's "I got hurt because I listened to DrParasite!!!" start light, and if you feel it's too easy, than add more weight. more weight = more muscle, more reps = more tone.

The sites below can give you a good starting point. Good luck!






 

DragonClaw

Forum Crew Member
41
2
8
Last I checked our job performance requirements, it was 125 solo, and 250 with a partner. I think....

Reality point: you need to be able to lift heavy objects in their industry. While it's 75% technique, it's still 25% muscle. You don't need to be a body builder, but you need some muscles.

Pushups are great, bench press is great, squats are great, bicep curls are great, leg presses are great. Do what you can.

If you want to join a gym, go for it. You can get a personal trainer, but they tend to be pricey. just work your muscles. Don't do more than you can handle, but push your limits. I always preferred working out with a buddy, but that's just me.

No one can give you weight requirements, because it's your body. If I tell you that you should be able to bench press 135 (which is the bar and one plate on each side), I don't want you to get hurt because you can't do it yet, and then it's "I got hurt because I listened to DrParasite!!!" start light, and if you feel it's too easy, than add more weight. more weight = more muscle, more reps = more tone.

The sites below can give you a good starting point. Good luck!






Oh, yes, I imagine practically I need to be able to do more. At this point, I want to complete the course. Then I won't be under the time constraint (6 months from the start) and I'll be free to reassess and see where I am on physical requirements. If I'm done with training and still lacking muscle, I'll probaby hit the gym for a few months before applying for a job.
 
Top