I failed again for the 3rd time NREMT-P, please help!!

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usafmedic45

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A slightly incompetent medic is better than no medic at all.

That's arguable.

Maybe this is me being naive as an outsider, but that's just my opinion. Who knows what my opinion will be after I take the EMT class and actually do the job. Take it with a grain of salt

That's a very healthy attitude that you can be critical and admit the limitations of your own judgment. Not a lot of people have that ability. Don't let go of that ever.
 

Veneficus

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I argue that allowing even that many attempts is excessive. If you can't pass it in two or three tries, sorry about your luck. I don't believe that extra consideration should be given simply because he's a veteran. That's akin to saying that you've earned the right to have your hand held because you're a foreign medical student.

It's not quite the same as saying "Well, we should be nicer to him because he's black" or whatever, because his veteran status was a choice but I still dislike slanting the playing field to any degree.

I have held the hands of many students, both in the military and out.

Some learn slower than others, In my opinion it doesn't make them lesser or unworthy.

Based on your statements here, military members or veterens should be given no bonus points, preferential seating, or any other form of favoritism or perk for having served? (just to mak sure it applies across the board)
 

Veneficus

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A slightly incompetent medic is better than no medic at all.

I disagree with this statement without exception.

I am not arguing that a student should should not meet the standard.

I am arguing that this student may need and deserves extra help and guidance while still within the current standards.

USAF doesn't believe that excessive attempts are warrented.

I don't believe a multiple choice exam accurately measures knowledge or ability.

But I think that we both agree once you fail to meet the standard, the game is over.
 

usafmedic45

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Based on your statements here, military members or veterens should be given no bonus points, preferential seating, or any other form of favoritism or perk for having served? (just to mak sure it applies across the board)

Not when it comes to those aspects where the favoritism might endanger the welfare of others. I have no problem with any of the other programs to support veterans however, I see no moral difference between someone who chooses to enlist versus someone who objects to military service and decides to serve their community in other ways. That's my opinion as someone who served. I'm happy and comfortable with the way I did my job but I don't think it makes me any better than the guy down the road who decided to be a volunteer firefighter or whatever instead of enlisting.
 

usafmedic45

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I don't believe a multiple choice exam accurately measures knowledge or ability.

But I think that we both agree once you fail to meet the standard, the game is over.

We do agree on both those points.
 

Veneficus

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Not when it comes to those aspects where the favoritism might endanger the welfare of others. I have no problem with any of the other programs to support veterans however, I see no moral difference between someone who chooses to enlist versus someone who objects to military service and decides to serve their community in other ways. That's my opinion as someone who served. I'm happy and comfortable with the way I did my job but I don't think it makes me any better than the guy down the road who decided to be a volunteer firefighter or whatever instead of enlisting.

But as you know, the fire service, many EMS services, and all levels of Law enforcement give a considerable bonus to exmilitary that are not also given to people who have been public servants on the civillian side.

I don't think it is fair somebody who served in the military should get a bonus when a guy who worked equally or longer as a police officer or firefighter doesn't.

But my opinion on that matters little.

Those occupations can cause injury.
 

usafmedic45

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But as you know, the fire service, many EMS services, and all levels of Law enforcement give a considerable bonus to exmilitary that are not also given to people who have been public servants on the civillian side.

I don't think it is fair somebody who served in the military should get a bonus when a guy who worked equally or longer as a police officer or firefighter doesn't.

But my opinion on that matters little.

Those occupations can cause injury.

Which is exactly my point. I tend to not have the highest opinion of the military (especially the Air Force) given the low quality of the leadership I worked with in the particular unit I was assigned to. You could not get promoted without being corrupt and immoral and engaging in an uncalled for amount of bootlicking.
 

mycrofft

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Back at the OP...

He had no prior experience, his preparation was an online prep mill and Cliff's Notes, and he has the opportunity to try it again if/when he gets down and does it the right way.

BTW, the "shirt" thing in basic training is to prove you can be trained to follow orders, then follow them, and to see how you react when you fail, as you must at some points. The OP didn't seem to me to be excessively whining or making excuses, but then I fell asleep trying to read all the replies.
But I was NOT texting!:cool:
 

Aidey

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I have held the hands of many students, both in the military and out.

Some learn slower than others, In my opinion it doesn't make them lesser or unworthy.

Based on your statements here, military members or veterens should be given no bonus points, preferential seating, or any other form of favoritism or perk for having served? (just to mak sure it applies across the board)

Bonus points, preferential seating or any other form of favoritism should end at the point a certifying/licensing test is applied.

I'm ok with discounts on fees/tuition, credit for military training, consideration when apply for school, extensions on cert expiration deadlines while deployed etc. However, unless you have a documented disability no exceptions on certifying tests. There is a difference between giving someone extra help in return for their service, and undermining the whole system to cut someone a break when they can't hack it themselves.
 

18G

Paramedic
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Personally, I felt the NREMT-P exam was MUCH easier than it was hyped up to be. It is an entry level exam with no real brain busters on there. Just basic principles and concepts that ensure effective and competent practice just starting off as a Medic.

My feeling is it should not take more than two times to pass the exam. I can understand failing it once but once you gain the exposure to it and know how to further prepare, I don't see any reason not to pass it the second time around.

Again, it's not a hard exam and if it's taking four or five times to pass it than there is obviously a problem and deficiency with the individual's knowledge base. Yes I know some people need tests read to them, etc, etc... I''m assuming the OP does not have these issues since they weren't mentioned.

I'm not sure what advice to give the OP at this point. Just read as much as you can EVERYDAY. Do not let a day go by that you do not read, study, or review something Paramedicine related. Make Google your best friend. Go beyond the basics in the text book and search Google for more indepth understanding.

I used JBlearning test prep... best $40 spent. I really credit JB learning for my passing on first try.
 
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usafmedic45

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Martyn

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A slightly incompetent medic is better than no medic at all. And this is also assuming the the incompetent medic has a partner and other individuals around them.

But only so you can sue their a55 and get more money...lol
 

ramrod5022

Forum Ride Along
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Did JB Learning help Anyone?

I am taking the Paramedic exam for the first time on Dec 22nd. I have passed the practical exam so i'm halfway there. Did anyone use JB Learning as a study tool and find it to be effective? I am also using Brady, Barron's, Smart phone Apps, and most importantly reading my book. May the force be with me
 

mycrofft

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Define slightly incompetent paramedic again?

How about "B-level", or "stronger in some aras than others"?
Incompetent means failed something, and the skills are often a concatenation between AP/physiology/Dx and TX skills. Fail one and it drags you down overall, maybe fatally.
Give me two snappy EMT-B's over a C-grade or incompetent paramedic any day.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Entry level exam needed.

One of the folks responding to my texting thread says he spends the first two days teaching student how to study and other remedial material.

The certification people and the licensure people need to make up their minds. If you are expecting college-level learning, then you need prereqs, and an entry exam would be a good idea. If you want this to be straddled between high school (or less) and community college, the lower the expectations for credentialing and licensure.
 

sweetpete

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Did anyone use JB Learning as a study tool and find it to be effective?

JB Learning was a good site. The questions were pretty well written and it helped me maintain the habit of taking online tests, similar to the registry.

Either way, I ended up passing the first time with only 80 questions, so I'm pretty thrilled.
 

MackTheKnife

BSN, RN-BC, EMT-P, TCRN, CEN
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In the 1980's, testing was all done on paper. Regardless of format, IMHO, evaluating what kind of a "test taker" you are might be a good starting point.
 

Medic76

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Or he will end up seriously hurting or killing a patient due to incompetents.
Just like the top of class Paramedic that passed NR at 80 first try who cardioverted on the T wave not the R wave killing his patient. True story. So there’s that….
 
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