Accepted to RN bridge!

akflightmedic

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Being ever the businessman/entrepreneur, this experience has given me many ideas. First and foremost, I would love to start my own private nursing program which specializes in ER/ICU...or even just call it critical care. The students will get all the foundational knowledge and exposure of course, but then all core lectures, classes, etc will be geared towards churning out Critical Care Nurses.

I think it can be done. Tell me it can't and that will be the best way for me to ensure it does. :)
 

ffemt8978

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Being ever the businessman/entrepreneur, this experience has given me many ideas. First and foremost, I would love to start my own private nursing program which specializes in ER/ICU...or even just call it critical care. The students will get all the foundational knowledge and exposure of course, but then all core lectures, classes, etc will be geared towards churning out Critical Care Nurses.

I think it can be done. Tell me it can't and that will be the best way for me to ensure it does. :)
It can't be done...at least not for a profit.

;)
 

Peak

ED/Prehospital Registered Nurse
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One of the biggest lies in healthcare is the nonsense that is taught in nursing school about nursing theory, nursing diagnosis, and so on with a distinct separation from the practice of medicine.

When you come into the ED I’m not triaging you an ESI 2 because you are at risk for impaired perfusion or whatever other NANDA BS, I’m concerned that you are having a MI, disection, PE, et cetera.

When I check your labs in the unit I’m concerned that you are hypokalemic from acute polyuric renal failure and as a result throwing ectopy, not some at risk of fluid balance shenanigans.

Many of the oldy moldy nursing school instructors still live in that mindset. They think about nursing diagnosis, as if these students haven’t taken a year of A&P, several semesters of chemistry, and several semesters of biology In addition to the pathophys and pharmacology you take in nursing school. It certainly isn’t the same depth as medical school but we can certainly talk about a patients medical problems.

I then get newgrads or practicum students in the EDs and Units and I have to get them to think in a real and modern way about the patients medical problems.

There is no nursing theory text in any department or unit I work in. We use peer reviewed nursing, pharmacy, and medical sources (particularly online) when we have a question. We use lexicomp and micromedix as our first two references for drug information, those nursing school pharm reference books have no place in our practice. We look at our xrays when they are shot, and the docs regularly ask us how their film looks before they can see it in PACS. We look at head ultrasounds as their being done, and head CTs while the patient is still in the scanner. We make vent changes based on gasses, and give fluids based on labs and invasive monitoring.

For some reason that I don’t fully understand there is a culture outside of critical care that x is the nurses job, y is the doctors job, z is so and so’s job. That just doesn’t work in emergency and intensive care, we are all there to treat patients.

Summary of rant: I didn’t enjoy the didactic portion of nursing school.
 

akflightmedic

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You have summarized well. It boggles my brain how these programs are conducted. I have held my tongue for nearly two years (outside of class). In class, I have been the absolute sh*t stirrer. I did not start off that way, however it came to a point where I could not remain silent. And then I was a target...it disgust me how they all preach this solidarity BS, yet they will chew you up and spit you out if they can. It is brutal. I speak not only from my perspective, but from several very close friends who had similar experiences at different schools in different states. It is endemic.
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
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There's real world
There's school world
and there is also NCLEX world

Also there is NREMT world TJC world etc

They are all parallel universes with varying resemblances to reality.

NANDA started as a good idea to allow nursing to bill separately instead of being part of the room charge. Academics seized it as a tool to be different from medicine. It can be taught in a non-totally useless way particularly for those new to healthcare. But it usually is used as a "only nursing cares" drum to beat on.

EMS mindsets find nursing theory and NANDA more painful than the average nursing student (who still find it painful).

Nursing theory is the most painful of all wastes of time. The problem isn't that nursing theory lacks male theorists. The problem is that most females cannot understand the underlying inanity and just parrot **** back like everyone else. Ever been forced to watch a the nursing theorist Jean Watson care theory meditation video and wonder what the **** she was smoking? Then your nursing professor tells you stories about getting high as **** with Jean Watson? People who enjoy nursing theory eventually become nursing professors starting the cycle of abuse all over again (not a nursing invention, but not shocked that nursing academics love APA).

The good news is that most nursing schools keep the total ******** to 10-20%. They teach heavy didactic knowledge and science that is applicable to real world practice even you have to warp your mind to cow-tow to NANDA care plan **** that you will never see again in your life once you pass NCLEX. And whoever invented APA formatting should have been involuntarily committed.

I experienced very little anti-male bias in nursing school, and all of it was from OB profs/former OB nurses.
 
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E tank

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Being ever the businessman/entrepreneur, this experience has given me many ideas. First and foremost, I would love to start my own private nursing program which specializes in ER/ICU...or even just call it critical care. The students will get all the foundational knowledge and exposure of course, but then all core lectures, classes, etc will be geared towards churning out Critical Care Nurses.

I think it can be done. Tell me it can't and that will be the best way for me to ensure it does. :)
Then it wouldn't be "nursing school". The nursing accreditation bodies would require more generalist training (peds, OB/G, med-surg), you're there, you know the deal. But with that would be all of the nursing theory stuff that the suits with the big scarves and hair dos love to talk about.

It was a real shame when the hospital based system of training went away. No nonsense. Far more practically and knowledge/skills based and if someone wanted to go on for a degree, more power to them.
 

akflightmedic

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Oh I am well aware....it would conform to the accrediting bodies, however it would always be taking you to the next level, real world application and critical concepts. Would not be a school for the un-motivated...
 
OP
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FiremanMike

EMS Coordinator
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View attachment 4920
Seriously though, this thread just confirms (for me) why, especially at my age, I have no desire to get my RN.
I have zero desire to be an RN, but I have a desire to move to the practitioner level..

Even though medical school isn't impossible in your late 40s and residency isn't impossible in your early 50s, I want the chance to slow down at some point before I die, so I've resigned myself that it's not going to happen in this lifetime. I'd seriously consider PA school, but ffs the pre-reqs are EXACTLY the same as for medical school, hell some PA schools even require an MCAT. If i'm going through all that trouble, I'm not going to limit my career and earning potential as a PA.

So that leaves NP school.. which despite the fact that it has damn near nothing to do with being an RN, requires an RN..
 

Summit

Critical Crazy
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Excuse you?
Ah I see how that line comes across. Not how it was meant.

To clarify:

Most females student nurses cannot understand the underlying inanity of nursing theory, just like the males cannot, because it is b*llshit. We all have to parrot it back in order not to be failed by dogmatic nursing profs.

Almost all nursing students (regardless of gender) see b*llshit as b*llshit but will cow tow to dogma to get through school.

The few who don't consider it BS are at high risk for becoming nursing professors.
 
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Summit

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Was wondering how long it would take for someone to respond to that.
Don't see why anyone would wait to call that out.

It was a poor writing on my part and came off very much not how intended.

That should be called out for clarity.
 

DesertMedic66

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If I could go get my RN and just go straight to RN pay without doing the 3 years ICU/ER experience, I would do it. I have -37 desire to work in a hospital.
Some flight programs allow a paramedic to nurse bridge. For my current company 4 years of full time flight medic experience counts as 2 years of full time RN. So you would only have to do 1 year in the ER/ICU as a nurse.
 

akflightmedic

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Well while I plug away on business stuff in the background, I managed to be offered a direct to ER position with no internship program with the understanding I would need precepting and orientation as long as needed. They also gave me half of my total paramedic experience as "nurse experience" for wage determination. So I am coming in as a 13 year nurse pay wise....nice eh? I also interviewed with the ICU director at the same time and she agreed to allow me to per diem in the ICU as well.

I suggested and they tried to accommodate me with a full time hybrid ER/ICU position, however that was tanked due to potential conflict when it came to mandatory weekends/holidays. So best case scenarios is FT ER with PD ICU...

The goal of all this is at the end of 1 year, I will have 2 years experience on paper. 1 in the ER and 1 in the ICU....Travel Gigs here I come.
 

Carlos Danger

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Some flight programs allow a paramedic to nurse bridge. For my current company 4 years of full time flight medic experience counts as 2 years of full time RN. So you would only have to do 1 year in the ER/ICU as a nurse.
That's exactly how I transitioned from FP to FN. To be honest, I think it's kind of a short-change. I was the first person who ever did it at my program, and CAMTS did not at the time have any experience requirements, so I was kind of an experiment. I did perfectly fine as a flight nurse, so of course I didn't realize at the time the significance of the shortcut. However, when I left flying for a while and went to work in a real, high-acuity ICU, I was pretty humbled at how much I didn't know about critical care. And that was after about 6 years of flying full time, a couple years of part-time ED nursing experience, and after holding my FP-C, CCEMTP, CFRN, and CCRN credentials for several years. It's just one of those "you don't know what you don't know" things.

It's entirely possible that others are much smarter than I am, or learn much quicker than I did, and therefore may have a different experience. But assuming the whole purpose of having both a paramedic and a nurse on the crew is to draw on the specific backgrounds that those different professions brings to the table, I think cutting down too much on the experience is not ideal. There are some things that you can only get from time on the job.
 
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