Is it possible?

slimedunkcurry

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I want to become a emt, but theres one issue I was convicted of a assualt charge at 19 (didnt went to jail, but I plead guilty). Can I still be an emt?
 

Akulahawk

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At some point in the future, if you have no further trouble with the law, level of charge you actually plead to (felony vs misdemeanor), number of years since the guilty plea, laws and regulations at the time... it might be possible for you to become an EMT. Every state has different rules/regs on this so you'll have to check your local situation. Also keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive, it isn't specific advice for your particular situation, and so on. It is best to consult with an attorney in your area who is familiar with EMS certification and criminal law for specific advice for your situation.

Just so you know, I worked with a guy who is a convicted felon of a violent crime. It took him YEARS, but he was a great partner.
 

MMiz

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Maybe.

The NREMT's policy outlines the details if your state requires NREMT certifications.

It looks like physical assault charges may lead to disqualification.

Their rationale states:
EMS professionals, under the authority of their state authorization to practice, have unsupervised, intimate, physical and emotional contact with patients at a time of maximum physical and emotional vulnerability, as well as unsupervised access to a patient’s personal property. These patients may be unable to defend or protect themselves, voice objections to particular actions, or provide accurate accounts of events at a later time. EMS professionals, therefore, are placed in a position of the highest public trust.

The public in need of out-of-hospital medical services relies on state authorization to practice and national certification to assure that those EMS professionals who respond to their calls for aid qualify for this extraordinary trust. For these reasons, the National Registry has adopted this Criminal Conviction Policy to ensure that individuals, who have been convicted of certain crimes, are identified and appropriately evaluated as to whether they would pose a risk to public safety as an EMS provider.

Good luck!
 
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slimedunkcurry

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At some point in the future, if you have no further trouble with the law, level of charge you actually plead to (felony vs misdemeanor), number of years since the guilty plea, laws and regulations at the time... it might be possible for you to become an EMT. Every state has different rules/regs on this so you'll have to check your local situation. Also keep in mind that this list is not comprehensive, it isn't specific advice for your particular situation, and so on. It is best to consult with an attorney in your area who is familiar with EMS certification and criminal law for specific advice for your situation.

Just so you know, I worked with a guy who is a convicted felon of a violent crime. It took him YEARS, but he was a great partner.
How is the pay like? Is there any longevity with this job at all?
 

ffemt8978

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How is the pay like? Is there any longevity with this job at all?
As a basic, the pay sucks and there is little to no longevity. Those come (comparitively speaking) at the medic level.
 

ffemt8978

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so pretty much theres not much to this job? i heard you can help with autopsies and stuff also is that true?
I haven't heard of that, although having witnessed an autopsy while working as an EMT/security in a hospital, I think observing one should be a required part of the EMT course. Seeing how organs are arranged in a diagram really doesn't compare to actually seeing it.

In all honesty, as a basic EMT there are only a few things you are allowed to do that somebody trained in first aid is not. Even fewer of those are truly life saving procedures.

That being said, there are still some patients that you will have a tremendous positive impact on, so nobody but you can decide if it is worth it to you.
 
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slimedunkcurry

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I haven't heard of that, although having witnessed an autopsy while working as an EMT/security in a hospital, I think observing one should be a required part of the EMT course. Seeing how organs are arranged in a diagram really doesn't compare to actually seeing it.

In all honesty, as a basic EMT there are only a few things you are allowed to do that somebody trained in first aid is not. Even fewer of those are truly life saving procedures.

That being said, there are still some patients that you will have a tremendous positive impact on, so nobody but you can decide if it is worth it to you.
I just recently found this out that my record can get expunged, but I'm assuming I'll still need to disclose it? Also is being a paramedic a "better" option?
 

Akulahawk

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I just recently found this out that my record can get expunged, but I'm assuming I'll still need to disclose it? Also is being a paramedic a "better" option?
If you are able to get your record "expunged" it won't change what your certifying agency will be able to see. They'll see the charge, the conviction, and the expungement. However, getting such a charge expunged may show that you've been sufficiently "rehabilitated" for that to be granted and that would be a point in your favor. Being a Paramedic does bring a LOT more education, skills, and responsibility to the equation. It is also usually tougher to be licensed as a Paramedic in terms of background checks because the "powers that be" will want to know that you can safely handle controlled substances and be around people safely. An expungement may prevent private employers from being able to see the conviction, but don't count on that.

Also know that getting a conviction expunged may not restore all your rights as some may have been curtailed for up to 10 years after conviction and a simple expungement may not remove that "disability" from you. However, this depends upon the exact charge and if it's a violent misdemeanor or a Felony.
 

DrParasite

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so pretty much theres not much to this job? i heard you can help with autopsies and stuff also is that true?
never heard about the autopsies... might be a question for you to ask your local coroner.

As for the first part, it depends on where you work, and what your role is in the EMS system. As an event medic, I have a lot of fun, get paid well, and enjoy what I do (even though it's only part time, and the pandemic has put the kibosh on most of the events). But I also realize that my role is assessment, stabilization, extrication, and removal to a more appropriate (on-site) location for treatment. When I was on a dual EMT 911 truck, I enjoyed most of what I did. our first due area was a small urban city, and half of the calls we went on were just us, no FD, and no ALS, and we did our job and treated the patient as needed. If ALS was needed, we called for them and usually met them as we were making our way to the hospital.
I did do a stint or two on an ALS truck, with one EMT and one medic.... and hated it, because I felt like I was just a paramedic helper and ambulance driver. When I was on the CCT truck at my old job (because I pissed off the schedule lady), I felt the exact same way, which is why I avoided the CCT truck whenever possible. But that is just me, and I know people that love CCT trucks. I also spent time in EMS Communications and Special Operations, all of which was handled by the EMS agency (but don't get me started on non-emergency ems communications and scheduling).

Now that I am mostly on the engine or QRV, I am typically with the patient for 10 minutes while the ambulance arrives. Assessment, live-saving interventions, and comfort the patient and family. And if EMS asks, take a ride to the ER with them.

the job is what you make of it. I haven't stepped foot on an ambulance in 5+ years, and I don't miss it; however, the 20 or so years I spent on the ambulance allowed me to become a halfway decent provider, which I use in my non-ambulance jobs.

If you are happy as an EMT, awesome. If you are happy as a paramedic, awesome. If you are miserable as an EMT, then you will probably not be happy as a paramedic, which a longer investment in time and education.
 

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