Is it normal to be nervous?

JackC83

Forum Probie
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About applying for your first potential job as an EMT?

I have Zero real world experience (except for 24 hours of mandated clinicals for my EMT program). I'm more of a "hands on" learner, and I don't feel as if I really know what I'm doing, unless I've done it a hundred times and it becomes second nature. Up to that point, my actions are less smooth, and thus less quick.

What was it like for you when you got your first job/volunteer gig as an EMT? Were you nervous? Were you a bit of a clumsy fool before getting the hang of it? Do they just sort of throw the keys to the ambulance at you, and just say "Here, have a go at it"? Or is it more like they ease you into it? What are n00bs treated like basically?

I have all the book knowledge, but I know that doesn't necessarily translate over to real world performance. Basically, I'm just nervous that when I get my first job as an EMT, that I'm going to be expected to be a "super smooth operator" when in reality I'm still just a total n00b.
 
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Achilles

Forum Moron
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About applying for your first potential job as an EMT?

I have Zero real world experience (except for 24 hours of mandated clinicals for my EMT program). I'm more of a "hands on" learner, and I don't feel as if I really know what I'm doing, unless I've done it a hundred times and it becomes second nature. Up to that point, my actions are less smooth, and thus less quick.

What was it like for you when you got your first job/volunteer gig as an EMT? Were you nervous? Were you a bit of a clumsy fool before getting the hang of it? Do they just sort of throw the keys to the ambulance at you, and just say "Here, have a go at it"? Or is it more like they ease you into it? What are n00bs treated like basically?

I have all the book knowledge, but I know that doesn't necessarily translate over to real world performance. Basically, I'm just nervous that when I get my first job as an EMT, that I'm going to be expected to be a "super smooth operator" when in reality I'm still just a total n00b.

Bring a hose stretcher with you that'll help calm you down a little

Honestly though, just be confident that is the key to success, and some other thing as well.
 

rhan101277

Forum Deputy Chief
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About applying for your first potential job as an EMT?

I have Zero real world experience (except for 24 hours of mandated clinicals for my EMT program). I'm more of a "hands on" learner, and I don't feel as if I really know what I'm doing, unless I've done it a hundred times and it becomes second nature. Up to that point, my actions are less smooth, and thus less quick.

What was it like for you when you got your first job/volunteer gig as an EMT? Were you nervous? Were you a bit of a clumsy fool before getting the hang of it? Do they just sort of throw the keys to the ambulance at you, and just say "Here, have a go at it"? Or is it more like they ease you into it? What are n00bs treated like basically?

I have all the book knowledge, but I know that doesn't necessarily translate over to real world performance. Basically, I'm just nervous that when I get my first job as an EMT, that I'm going to be expected to be a "super smooth operator" when in reality I'm still just a total n00b.

Yeah I was nervous and un-sure of myself. As you get more experience that goes away. However when I expect a call will be tough I still get nervous and want to make sure I do the right thing. Anyone that tells you they aren't is burned out. Things can always go south, even on the simplest call. I just fall back on my education and experience and do the best I can with what I have.
 

leoemt

Forum Captain
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Im currently on FTO at my first 911 emt job. I am nervous but I am confident in my skills. Take one day at a time, pay attention and learn from not only your FTO's but also from the senior EMTs.

For me personally its not my BLS skills that make me nervous, rather its the routine ePCR's and short reports that I need to get better at.

Coming from a police background I am having a hard time adjusting to writing my narratives the medical way.
 

SSwain

Forum Captain
313
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Yup.
I work mostly weekend nights (paid on call volunteer). Each night at the station as I am going to sleep, I run through a different portion of the training that I have had to mentally brush up on whatever call may come at O-dark thirty.
Running through my pharmacolgy has paid off 2x now when the medic on duty has had me neb pt's. I am getting more confortaqble with the unknown.

And yes I acted like a bumbling fool on my first few calls, but talking to the medics post incident and having them critique me honestly has helped me learn from mistakes and I have not repeated them.
 

Albanyco

Forum Ride Along
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It took me a little while to get the hang of it. Confidence comes with experience. Keep your mouth closed and your ears open. Learn from your coworkers. Have a thick skin, you are going to take some static here and there.
 

FDJohn

Forum Probie
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Of course it's normal to be nervous. The more you do it though the more confident you will get. Personally I think getting the shaking hand every now and then is perfectly fine(unless I'm starting an IV). It reminds me of why I do this. It's a high stress field of work and each of us are given a lot of responsibility. Routine call jitters will pass quickly, but don't expect to stop getting the adrenaline on level 1 trauma patients any time soon.
 

EMTthealmost

Forum Ride Along
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I was only in ent class today.. completely froze the dummy was having a possible t.I.a. and lol I choked.. on the er radio narrative


I felt so horrible lead out of the group.
 

mycrofft

Still crazy but elsewhere
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Im currently on FTO at my first 911 emt job. I am nervous but I am confident in my skills. Take one day at a time, pay attention and learn from not only your FTO's but also from the senior EMTs.

For me personally its not my BLS skills that make me nervous, rather its the routine ePCR's and short reports that I need to get better at.

Coming from a police background I am having a hard time adjusting to writing my narratives the medical way.

Are you using sap gloves to take Hx?;)
 

stano0098

Forum Ride Along
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0
1
After my EMT class I joined the local FD and started for the FF1 certificate. The day I joined I was so nervous about doing something wrong on the first couple calls. After running a couple severe MVAs with the FD it does get a lot less stressful and you know how to handle yourself when these situations come.

Also having people to guide you through what you haven't been through yet is a real big help. Once I landed my part time job with the local ambulance I was even more nervous bc now I'm with patients all the way too the hospital not just assisting them to the ambulance. But having a good coworker really really helps. Someone who knows how first timers really feel about walking into an extremely intense situation and not really knowing the "right" way to do things.

But once you know the "routine" it's the best job in the world.
 

Handsome Robb

Youngin'
Premium Member
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If you weren't nervous that'd say to me that you've got the wrong attitude.

Worked as an Intermediate for 9ish months been on my own as a medic for 3. Still get nervous when I go into work.
 

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