How do you pass the freaking test!!!

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gotbeerz001

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Hmm. I have heard there is not an android app (which is silly). You should be able to access the site but the good part of the app is that it is portable and does not require a subscription.

Otherwise, the quizzes do exactly what you say; provide strategies for how to identify what is being asked.
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
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^ See the post above yours.

Also, I have a hard time when people say they are "bad test takers".
Either you don't know the material or you have poor reading comprehension and do not understand what is being asked; you can work towards finding tools to correct either of those deficiencies. To say you are a bad test taker is a cop out with no real path for correction.

I am typically a "good test-taker", but for the sake of argument, I do believe there are "bad test-takers".

1). There are people as you pointed out who have poor reading or comprehension skills, but it can go beyond that...

2). There are people who have difficulty with "critical thinking", that is to say, they have difficulty with their reasoning skills. (This is the one that is hardest to fix, especially as an adult)

3). There are people who experience severe anxiety from tests in general. I guess if you had a time machine and could go back and fix the right trigger that began it all, or could delicately re-wire someone's neural pathways, then this could be a simple fix. However, there are some medical solutions that can help, certain medications, certain dispensation for lighting in the room, or other factors to affect testing anxiety.

4). There are people who have difficulty focusing. The exam starts and all they are concerned with is the sweating of their palms, the temperature in the room, the barely audible ticking of the clock, how their dry erase marker isn't working very well, what the person seated near them is wearing...

Regardless, there are some awesome EMTs that I work with who know the book information for medic school down cold, are awesome in the field under pressure, can reason through long case examples, but can't pass the test, and have difficulty passing written tests in general. It's not just as simple as saying, "Work harder to get smarter." There can certainly be other factors involved.
 

STXmedic

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The type you describe, who truly have the book knowledge but can't pass the test due to some severe performance anxiety, are very few and far between. Just about every student we get that fails will use the "bad test taker" excuse- especially the students who fail the second or third time (luckily we don't get too many of those). For 95% of them, I'm not surprised at all that they failed. Their knowledge is lacking, despite how they come off to their peers. They either don't study or don't study effectively, and their knowledge is far lower than what they perceive.
 

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Gurby

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I have an android. Will the test prep work from a computer or android. Also, my reading comprehension is sort of what i mean when i say im a bad test taker. I do have issues understanding what a question is asking me. I also tend to read in to the question instead of answering what the question is asking. I guess im looking for some sort of material that will have me with identifying tricks within the tests that are designed to throw you off, or keywords to look out for in a question

Forget about EMS. You should open up a holistic urgent care clinic, that's where the money is.
 

weezeehamilton

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I am typically a "good test-taker", but for the sake of argument, I do believe there are "bad test-takers".

1). There are people as you pointed out who have poor reading or comprehension skills, but it can go beyond that...

2). There are people who have difficulty with "critical thinking", that is to say, they have difficulty with their reasoning skills. (This is the one that is hardest to fix, especially as an adult)

3). There are people who experience severe anxiety from tests in general. I guess if you had a time machine and could go back and fix the right trigger that began it all, or could delicately re-wire someone's neural pathways, then this could be a simple fix. However, there are some medical solutions that can help, certain medications, certain dispensation for lighting in the room, or other factors to affect testing anxiety.

4). There are people who have difficulty focusing. The exam starts and all they are concerned with is the sweating of their palms, the temperature in the room, the barely audible ticking of the clock, how their dry erase marker isn't working very well, what the person seated near them is wearing...

Regardless, there are some awesome EMTs that I work with who know the book information for medic school down cold, are awesome in the field under pressure, can reason through long case examples, but can't pass the test, and have difficulty passing written tests in general. It's not just as simple as saying, "Work harder to get smarter." There can certainly be other factors involved.

I definitely do experience a lot of anxiety when it comes to taking any test, as well as an inability to focus. and im sure everyone experiences some level of anxiety as well. but for whatever reason my anxiety gets the best of me and i dont pass. i know some of my flaws when taking tests. I just dont know how to go about fixing it
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
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I definitely do experience a lot of anxiety when it comes to taking any test, as well as an inability to focus. and im sure everyone experiences some level of anxiety as well. but for whatever reason my anxiety gets the best of me and i dont pass. i know some of my flaws when taking tests. I just dont know how to go about fixing it

If you take realistic practice tests with high marks, but consistently get low ones when taking them for real, and you are fairly sure this is due to anxiety, then speak with your doctor about it. Your doctor can possibly prescribe a medication in limited quantity for anxiety while testing, and can also write a note to allow for slightly changed test conditions to accommodate your disability (assuming the doctor diagnoses the issue as a disability related to testing anxiety).
 

TattooedNay

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Your doctor can possibly prescribe a medication in limited quantity for anxiety while testing, and can also write a note to allow for slightly changed test conditions to accommodate your disability (assuming the doctor diagnoses the issue as a disability related to testing anxiety).


I highly discourage this.
 

TattooedNay

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While in medic school, I was fortunate enough to have an insane instructor who would intentionally try to create distractions during class, and quizzes. I still have trouble focusing on people clicking pens or listening to the heavy breathers. but during my two years I realized I was over thinking everything. I decided to go into tests with a positive attitude, thinking "MAN, I LOVE TESTS. THEY ARE SO MUCH FUN. FEELING UNCOMFORTABLE IS THE BEST" I kept repeating that. It became my mantra or sick twisted positive affirmation. Saying I loved the challenge and loved the stress. I did the same with interviews, going into them thinking this is all a game- I am smart, I know this material, I am a gem, I WILL pass and I WILL get hired.

For some reason it worked. I take my NRP next week and although I'm nervous, I've just come to terms with it. At this point I have taken so many f'n tests I am too exhausted to lose sleep over this. I know the information is in there.. on one hand, getting worked up isn't productive, but I like to think a little anxiety is helpful.

ALSO *fun fact*- I have a playlist of "fight songs" that pump me up. It's usually really deep south gangster rap. I'm a little white girl, and I will sit in the parking lot just blasting music. I don't care. You need to find what works for you. Good luck! You got this!
 

joshrunkle35

EMT-P/RN
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While in medic school, I was fortunate enough to have an insane instructor who would intentionally try to create distractions during class, and quizzes. I still have trouble focusing on people clicking pens or listening to the heavy breathers. but during my two years I realized I was over thinking everything. I decided to go into tests with a positive attitude, thinking "MAN, I LOVE TESTS. THEY ARE SO MUCH FUN. FEELING UNCOMFORTABLE IS THE BEST" I kept repeating that. It became my mantra or sick twisted positive affirmation. Saying I loved the challenge and loved the stress. I did the same with interviews, going into them thinking this is all a game- I am smart, I know this material, I am a gem, I WILL pass and I WILL get hired.

For some reason it worked. I take my NRP next week and although I'm nervous, I've just come to terms with it. At this point I have taken so many f'n tests I am too exhausted to lose sleep over this. I know the information is in there.. on one hand, getting worked up isn't productive, but I like to think a little anxiety is helpful.

ALSO *fun fact*- I have a playlist of "fight songs" that pump me up. It's usually really deep south gangster rap. I'm a little white girl, and I will sit in the parking lot just blasting music. I don't care. You need to find what works for you. Good luck! You got this!

All I can picture is a bunch of SEALs getting wet and sandy having the freezing tide rushing in, arms all locked together while being asked questions about cardiac medications.

Seriously, it's an unrealistic test. If it were realistic, you would answer every question with a partner or two and be able to contact online medical control, look up cheat sheets, field guides, etc.

It has more to do with academia and institutional inertia ("I did it this way, we do it this way, you will do it this way") than it does a test to measure ones job performance ability.

Getting special dispensation or treatment to cope with a singular moment of anxiety in no way reflects the future of the job. At all. It's no different than the people who need Xanax 1-2 times a year only when they fly somewhere. Situational anxiety is a real thing for some people.
 

Medic76

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^ See the post above yours.

Also, I have a hard time when people say they are "bad test takers".
Either you don't know the material or you have poor reading comprehension and do not understand what is being asked; you can work towards finding tools to correct either of those deficiencies. To say you are a bad test taker is a cop out with no real path for correction.
Not true. I know some of the very BEST Paramedics that are horrible nervous second guessing test takers. Your comment is judgmental, inaccurate and rude.
 
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