Does your state allow this?

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
10,483
1,168
113
In Washington, we have a law that allows EMT's to administer Epi-Pens to somebody in certain circumstances. (Note: This is not to be confused with patient assisted Epi-Pens. Each ambulance in the state carries their own Epi-Pens, and this law allows us to use them.) I'll describe the criteria we have to meet, but I would like to know if your state has a similar law. (Note: Our criteria is actually in a flowchart format that makes it much easier to go through than these questions)

Is EPI needed?
If NO, then do not administer EPI.
If YES, then continue.

Does the patient have a prescription?
If YES, then administer EPI to any age patient.
If NO, then continue.

Is the patient under 18 years old?
If NO, then do not administer EPI and call medical control.
If YES, then continue.

Has the patient, parent, or guardian requested EPI be administered (verbal or written)?
If NO, then do not administer EPI.
If YES, then administer EPI.

Basically, this allows us to administer EPI to a patient that needs it but doesn't have a prescription. The law is known as the Kristine Kastner Act, and I think it is a good law.
 

rescuecpt

Community Leader Emeritus
2,088
1
0
In my county (in New York State we take medical direction from our County, or from the City of New York if you are in NYC) if the patient does not have their own epi-pen you have to call our Online Medical Control for permission.

In my county, it is located at the State hospital and staffed by Paramedics who are able to give you a certain amount of direction, then page the medical control designated ER doc on duty for further permissions.
 
OP
ffemt8978

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
10,483
1,168
113
Originally posted by rescuelt@Jun 24 2004, 09:04 PM
In my county (in New York State we take medical direction from our County, or from the City of New York if you are in NYC) if the patient does not have their own epi-pen you have to call our Online Medical Control for permission.

In my county, it is located at the State hospital and staffed by Paramedics who are able to give you a certain amount of direction, then page the medical control designated ER doc on duty for further permissions.
That's the way it was when I was in Iowa and South Dakota. My understanding of the law is that it came about because a teenage female died from anaphylatic shock and the BLS ambulance service wasn't able to provide the Epi she needed.
 

SafetyPro2

Forum Safety Officer
772
2
0
Nope. In LA County (where I'm certified), we can only assist/administer a prescribed EpiPen.

In Orange County (next county over), they can't even do that.

However, school administrators can stock EpiPens and administer to any student they determine needs it. Makes a lot of sense.
 

sunshine1026

Forum Crew Member
47
0
0
Maryland protocols allow EMT-Bs to assist a patient experiencing an allergic reaction with the patient's own OR the EMS service's Epi-pen, if the patient is experiencing "moderate to severe" symptoms or "mild symptoms with a history of a life-threatening allergic reaction."

For asthma, EMT-Bs can assist with the patient's prescribed Epi-pen, but can only use the Epi-pen off of the ambulance with medical direction.
 

cbdemt

Forum Lieutenant
145
0
0
In IL we can assist the patient with their own, or use the EPI pen or EPI pen Jr. that we carry on the rig. It can be used for "suspected allergic reaction". We are to attempt to call medical direction, but can administer the drug without direction if contact cant me made or if we believe a delay would be immediately life threatening. (guess how often medical direction gets a call for that one... oops radio was broken, oh well)
 

spunkygizmo

Forum Probie
10
0
0
Here in TN, we can give sub-cutaneous epi injections, help a patient with their own Epi-Pen or administer from an Epi-Pen on the ambulance. Of course with the injections you have to get medical direction, but we are licensed to do it.
 

MMiz

I put the M in EMTLife
Community Leader
5,368
341
83
We are allowed to assist the pt with their EPI pen, but don't carry them. We're allowed to assist pt with any meds, but don't carry any. We only cary O2 and Oral Glucose. This is BLS of course.
 
OP
ffemt8978

ffemt8978

Forum Vice-Principal
Community Leader
10,483
1,168
113
Our BLS units carry the following, and are allowed to use them:

O2
Oral Glucose
Activated Charcoal
81mg Aspirins
Epi-Pens

We are allowed to patient assist the following:

Metered Dose Inhalers
Nitroglycerin
Epi-Pens
Any other meds after contacting medical control.
 

citizencain20

Forum Probie
15
0
0
Originally posted by cbdemt@Jun 25 2004, 09:10 AM
In IL we can assist the patient with their own, or use the EPI pen or EPI pen Jr. that we carry on the rig. It can be used for "suspected allergic reaction". We are to attempt to call medical direction, but can administer the drug without direction if contact cant me made or if we believe a delay would be immediately life threatening. (guess how often medical direction gets a call for that one... oops radio was broken, oh well)
LOL - Same circumstances...I know how that goes! ;)
 

SafetyPro2

Forum Safety Officer
772
2
0
We carry:

oral glucose
oxygen

That's it in the drug department.

We can assist with EpiPens, bronchodilators and nitro if prescribed.
 

Top