Critical Care Ops

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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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I believe it is standardized for everyone. 8 weeks doing simulations, OR time, and 3rd rider and then 3 months "probationary" period. I am sure it would be extended if needed.
Very cool. Congrats, and welcome to HEMS.
Your program is well respected.
 

Carlos Danger

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@Remi, very cool. Were the ground paramedics utilized in a critical care fashion, or did they mainly drive?

What was your scene to IFT ratio at the RRT/RN/RN program?

We have one (large) program up and down the California coast that is an entire RN/RN configuration. They fly all 135's if I am not mistaken, with one or two FW in their fleet.
They were recently acquired by one of the larger competitors as well.

Thanks guys for contributing, good stuff!:)

Unfortunately, paramedics weren't really utilized much in this program. The only CCT that the medics did was sometimes they'd go on transport with one of the flight nurses and an EMT driver. Most often though, they'd be doing ALS transports with an EMT driver, or they'd be driving for an RN/RN or RN/RRT team.

The other 2 programs I flew with were paramedic/RN. Both were small, 2-base HEMS programs.
 

gonefishing

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Several ground cct units dual RN/RT and 2 emts in the past experience. Air was private call in or county based.

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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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Several ground cct units dual RN/RT and 2 emts in the past experience. Air was private call in or county based.

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Were your guys RT's on call or did you have separate RT units?

In my old AMR BLS CCT days we had both RN/EMT/EMT, and RRT/EMT/EMT units, respectively.
 

gonefishing

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Were your guys RT's on call or did you have separate RT units?

In my old AMR BLS CCT days we had both RN/EMT/EMT, and RRT/EMT/EMT units, respectively.
It eventually became dual role rn so they would play the role of both rt and rn.
I now work at an awesome company with incredible flight medics! Truly angels in the sky and incredibly knowledgeable!

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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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It eventually became dual role rn so they would play the role of both rt and rn.
I now work at an awesome company with incredible flight medics! Truly angels in the sky and incredibly knowledgeable!

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Where's this at?? Surely not Kern County!?:confused:
 

CALEMT

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In my old AMR BLS CCT days we had both RN/EMT/EMT, and RRT/EMT/EMT units, respectively.

It's still this way in Riverside Co. to the extent of my knowledge.
 
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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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It's still this way in Riverside Co. to the extent of my knowledge.
I had a blast doing CCT work at AMR. They had some very knowledgeable RN's and RT's, too.
 

EpiEMS

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In my old AMR BLS CCT days we had both RN/EMT/EMT, and RRT/EMT/EMT units, respectively.
Are these RNs with medic scope of practice and formulary?
 
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VentMonkey

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Are these RNs with medic scope of practice and formulary?
No, they had an "ALS bag", a monitor, and IV pumps. There was no RSI, anything they wanted done needed to be done prior to leaving the sending facility, or with a doctors order to be done en route. They did not participate in, nor usually cared to, in the "911" system.

Still, most had been RN's, and RT's long enough to remember candy stripes, and the "iron lung", and again, were a wealth of knowledge if you were smart enough to take advantage.
 

EpiEMS

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No, they had an "ALS bag", a monitor, and IV pumps. There was no RSI, anything they wanted done needed to be done prior to leaving the sending facility, or with a doctors order to be done en route. They did not participate in, nor usually cared to, in the "911" system.

Still, most had been RN's, and RT's long enough to remember candy stripes, and the "iron lung", and again, were a wealth of knowledge if you were smart enough to take advantage.
Interesting. So generally few new en route interventions?
 
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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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Interesting. So generally few new en route interventions?
Generally, yes; they functioned soley as mobile ICU's. They didn't have their own separate set of protocols to work under on their own.
 

TXpeds16

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I'm currently working for a pediatric transport team that does RW/FW/ground. CAMTS certified in all modes of transportation. Primary configurations are RN/RT/Medic. There are Medic/Medic teams, however they basically just do BLS calls. Prior to this I did 4 1/2 years in a fairly busy 911 system with dual medic configuration. There we had transitioned to E-450 chassis with gas engines and varying boxes.

At my current employer...

For ground transportation our frontline trucks are F-550 chassis with Horton boxes.

For RW we contract with PHI who supplies a Sikorski S-76C++. It is a dual pilot IFR program. The S-76 is the only RW i've been in, and I feel it has ruined me for future flight jobs. We have no weight limit, and it comfortably seats four persons in the back and can fit two patients. It's a Cadillac.

FW is contracted with Sevenbar Aviation. They supply a Cessna Citation as our primary, and backup is currently a King Air. Again a dual pilot program.
 

usalsfyre

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I'm currently working for a pediatric transport team that does RW/FW/ground. CAMTS certified in all modes of transportation. Primary configurations are RN/RT/Medic. There are Medic/Medic teams, however they basically just do BLS calls. Prior to this I did 4 1/2 years in a fairly busy 911 system with dual medic configuration. There we had transitioned to E-450 chassis with gas engines and varying boxes.

At my current employer...

For ground transportation our frontline trucks are F-550 chassis with Horton boxes.

For RW we contract with PHI who supplies a Sikorski S-76C++. It is a dual pilot IFR program. The S-76 is the only RW i've been in, and I feel it has ruined me for future flight jobs. We have no weight limit, and it comfortably seats four persons in the back and can fit two patients. It's a Cadillac.

FW is contracted with Sevenbar Aviation. They supply a Cessna Citation as our primary, and backup is currently a King Air. Again a dual pilot program.

It's funny how the world is small enough you know what programs everyone works for.
 

Akulahawk

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@usalsfyre, nice! I haven't heard of too many PM/PM HEMS configurations. How did you find it worked in terms of efficiency? I'd imagine you'd have to be a pretty solid CCP to work double PM, on a FW nonetheless.


@Chase , just for my personal knowledge, how long is each new hires training once they're placed at their base of hire? Is it dependent on them personally? Is there a bare minimum?

"
@Remi, very cool. Were the ground paramedics utilized in a critical care fashion, or did they mainly drive?

What was your scene to IFT ratio at the RRT/RN/RN program?

We have one (large) program up and down the California coast that is an entire RN/RN configuration. They fly all 135's if I am not mistaken, with one or two FW in their fleet.
They were recently acquired by one of the larger competitors as well.


Thanks guys for contributing, good stuff!:)
The program that was acquired by a "larger competitor" was probably actually acquired by the parent company. IIRC, they do fly EC135's and a couple of FW, but I recall when the competitor and the company you're referring to both had just 4 bases. The company you're likely referring to used to fly exclusively BO-105's. I've spent many nights unloading patients from one of their 105's to transport them about 2 blocks from pad to ED.
 
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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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The program that was acquired by a "larger competitor" was probably actually acquired by the parent company. IIRC, they do fly EC135's and a couple of FW, but I recall when the competitor and the company you're referring to both had just 4 bases. The company you're likely referring to used to fly exclusively BO-105's. I've spent many nights unloading patients from one of their 105's to transport them about 2 blocks from pad to ED.
Yes, indeed you are correct. I forgot you're from NorCal. The epicenter of their ops:).
 

Flight-LP

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The program that was acquired by a "larger competitor" was probably actually acquired by the parent company. IIRC, they do fly EC135's and a couple of FW, but I recall when the competitor and the company you're referring to both had just 4 bases. The company you're likely referring to used to fly exclusively BO-105's. I've spent many nights unloading patients from one of their 105's to transport them about 2 blocks from pad to ED.
Interestingly enough, the acquisition was through the California based LLC company, not the parent company. They are now owned by the same folks, but are going to remain (for now) separate brands and companies. So far it has worked smoothly..........
 
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VentMonkey

VentMonkey

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Interestingly enough, the acquisition was through the California based LLC company, not the parent company. They are now owned by the same folks, but are going to remain (for now) separate brands and companies. So far it has worked smoothly..........
Do you see their current configuration being replaced with the more "cost-effective" paramedic/ RN staffing?

I personally like their current set up as it's unique to California, and seems to work well for them.
 

Handsome Robb

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Are you talking about CALSTAR?


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