Lower back exercises

Mufasa556

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I've been a basic for seven years now and it's starting to take its toll on my lower back. A while back I transferred to a slower station to protect my back, but spending all day in our horrific company provided chairs may be doing more damage than running calls.

Anyone have any decent core and lower back workouts they'd like to share?
 

irishboxer384

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I used to mess up my lumbar region playing rugby years ago and had some physio for it- ended up doing 15 lower back extensions (see picture) every morning when I woke up and before I went to sleep. After a few months I was squared away.

As for general core body strength it is hard to beat the various types of pushups.
 

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TheJammer

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I had problems when I started my first real job with my back,and still do sometimes. But I've found basic barbell exercises to be of enormous help.
Squats and deadlifts helped me so much. Don't forget planks!
 

COmedic17

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I have ideas, but I get moderated enough as is.
 

Amelia

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I've been a basic for seven years now and it's starting to take its toll on my lower back. A while back I transferred to a slower station to protect my back, but spending all day in our horrific company provided chairs may be doing more damage than running calls.

Anyone have any decent core and lower back workouts they'd like to share?

Don't laugh... yoga.

I broke my tailbone 6 years ago- and yoga was the only thing that helped. I threw my back out when I was 24 (yeah yeah yeah), yoga. It will stretch and strengthen your back. Then I started weight training. Awesomeness. Those are my two cents.
 
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Mufasa556

Mufasa556

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Thank you to everyone who replied.

I dropped a bunch of weight and that helped a lot.

I'll start doing the lower back extensions and start a deadlift squat routine.

I've heavily considered yoga. I tried it once, but was drunk. Should probably give it a go sober. One of the RNs I work with swears by it. Does it every night after shift. I need to work on flexibility anyways. The last time I got down to c-spine a patient, oh my, back and hamstrings super tight.
 

Amelia

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Thank you to everyone who replied.

I dropped a bunch of weight and that helped a lot.

I'll start doing the lower back extensions and start a deadlift squat routine.

I've heavily considered yoga. I tried it once, but was drunk. Should probably give it a go sober. One of the RNs I work with swears by it. Does it every night after shift. I need to work on flexibility anyways. The last time I got down to c-spine a patient, oh my, back and hamstrings super tight.

It also helps you relax. I would go to a class so an instructor can make sure your posturing is correct so you dont hurt yourself more. Dont do hot yoga though. Lol
 

GirevikMedic

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The funny thing is, the problem most likely is not your lower back but rather a number of other things. The vast majority of our population (not just EMS but Western culture in general) breaks down something like this:

Heeled boots/shoes:
  • Leads to tightened calf muscles. This leads to issues of posture, gait mechanics and weight distribution. Also leads to restricted ankle/foot mobility which kind of has a snowball effect with the postural compensations. Any/all of this leads to compensations and deficiencies in mechanics of the knees and hips/glutes, which results in increased compensation of the back.

Constant/regular/prolonged sitting:
  • Tightened hamstrings. Further aggravates the issues mentioned above.
  • Tightened hip flexors. Further aggravates the issues above. Also, it's what plays a very large role in excess lumbar curvature due to the attachment sites of some of the muscles that make up the HF complex. So not only is the lumbar compensating mechanically, but it's doing so with structural deficiencies of its own as well. Plus those structural deficiencies create more postural issues and more mechanical deficiencies.
  • Weakend abdominal/core. This includes way more than the "6-pack" abs. The core/trunk realistically includes the rectus abdominus (6-pack), internal/external obliques, transverse abdominus, spinal erectors and even the diaphragm. Essentially, the act of sitting with supported seats has caused all that stabilizing musculature to get lazy since it's not having to work as hard and/or as long.
  • Slouched upper back/shoulders. Contributes to decreased shoulder and thoracic spine mobility as well as postural problems. Thoracic limitations - much like the hips/glutes/knees/feet - cause huge amounts of compensation and extra workload to be taken on by the lumbar. Also contributes to forward head/neck posture.
Here's my advice (I'm also a certified personal trainer) fix the deficiencies first. Workouts are not what are needed here. Not yet. Address the problem areas first - likely, we'll never fully resolve these but we can make large strides in correction and future management. Then ease in to a work out program.

Here's the easiest recommendation I can make....

Look into a book called Original Strength (via Amazon or at www.originalstrenght.net, there's even a YouTube channel). It's stabilization and movement restoration/improvement system. On the surface it may seem ridiculously minimal and too easy. But IT WORKS and the theories are sound. Take your time with the steps and progressions. Don't rush anything. Even the simplest things work well. It's all about consistency, frequency and repitition. In addition to that, work out stretching areas such as calves, hamstrings, hip flexors, upper chest/front shoulders. Another good resource you can utilize in conjunction with OS is a book called Super Joints (check Amazon or DragonDoor.com).

Once you've made sound progress there, kettlebells (used correctly) are pretty awesome. Enter the Kettlebell (again, Amazon or DragonDoor). Get the book and DVD. Follow the Program Minimum for as long as needed.
 

Amelia

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Yoga is very good exercise too and stretches the muscles for optimum flexibility.
 

TF Medic

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Lift weights.

Full body strength with compound lifts will make you stronger, including your accessory muscles. With proper training it will teach you proper technique and body positioning. The lifts you should be doing are deadlifts, squats, bench press, and overhead press.

There are other good exercises, but compound movements are the best use of your time. Those four lifts will do everything you need.

You can substitute other movements that work the same muscle groups. Kettlebell swings instead of deadlifts, goblet squats instead of barbell squats, pushups instead of bench press, etc. The movements are important, how you accomplish them is less important.

If I had to pick one, deadlifts are closest to what we do on shift.
 

SandpitMedic

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I have ideas, but I get moderated enough as is.


I know this is a little old, but....How did I miss this thread?

@Mufasa556 Have you every gotten a therapeutic massage? Like legit from a chiropractor's office. I usually get a massage a month and get adjusted... Usually 2weeks/2weeks. This is in addition to my workout routine, which is dynamic and included the whole back.
Thankfully I don't have chronic pain or anything like that, but I do want to prevent it and do anything I can. Hope you're doing better, bud.
 

EBMEMT

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Low back disorders by Stuart mcgill., the doc who measured stress and strain on each vertebrae doing exercises and work. Helps if you know your anatomy before reàding.
 

Tim Wagner

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A series of exercise routines are there, you can do to help reduce any lower back pain like knee rolls or back extensions.
 

SandpitMedic

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I've been a basic for seven years now and it's starting to take its toll on my lower back. A while back I transferred to a slower station to protect my back, but spending all day in our horrific company provided chairs may be doing more damage than running calls.

Anyone have any decent core and lower back workouts they'd like to share?

How's your back? Any improvement? Did you take up a workout routine?
 
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Mufasa556

Mufasa556

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I started a workout routine and have been steadily losing weight which has made things much better. I absolutely hate doing cardio so I do a lot of hiking to trick my brain into thinking I'm not actually doing cardio. I used to do a lot of weight lifting and have gotten back into it. It has all helped out a lot.

A buddy of mine, who has a couple buldged disks, told me that core strength exercises really helped him out and they have me as well.

I considered yoga, but always weasel out of going with one of our RNs. That said, just basic stretching as helped a lot. I'll stretch out in the shower, a couple of times on shift, and before I crawl into bed in the morning.

i don't think I'll ever be back 100%, but I'm heading in the right direction.

I really appreciate all the responses. I'll try to be more diligent on following up on this thread.
 

SandpitMedic

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Glad to hear buddy. Take care of your back.
 
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