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View Full Version : Besides the ambulance/fd, where else can you work as an EMT?


JJR512
09-27-2006, 04:26 PM
I asked someone at my fire station (volunteer), who was wearing the uniform of one of the area's private ambulance companies, if he could help me get a job there. He said he could, then he also told me he had another job as an EMT, at a Six Flags amusement park.

I was kind of shocked for a moment because it had never occurred to me before that there are other ways to work as an EMT besides basically doing ambulance work, whether with the volunteer or paid fire department or a private ambulance company.

So now I'm trying to look for a job in other fields, but my mind still isn't working...So far, the zoo is the only other place I've thought of that might keep an EMT on site. Can you please help me by pointing out some other types of places to work that keep EMTs on site? :)

Ridryder911
09-27-2006, 04:37 PM
There are so many..
Clinics,
ER's
Casino's
Police Tactical Teams
Airports
Industries
Mining
Off Shore Drilling
Foreign Country Security/Police/EMS Teams
Underwater Welding/Dive Teams

and on .... on

Good luck,

R/r 911

EMTalex
09-27-2006, 05:45 PM
if your out in california, i heard that Dinsey land and the surrounding area pay very well

jedirye
09-27-2006, 09:23 PM
Eh, I'm kind of in your boat. Most places around here that have EMT's are firedepartments. I want to work in an ambulance but not be a firefighter (well, not yet). I'm going into Medic school and want some experience, so it looks like I'll be commuting an hour for an ambulance company that does emergency calls as well.

Good luck in your search!

-rye

BloodNGlory02
09-27-2006, 10:33 PM
I did the Six Flags thing in IL. It was a fun job, but you didnt see much in terms of skills, basically bandaid administration. I'd look into security, ER tech's (although most want IV experience), hospital security, stadiums (baseball/football) they might staff a first aid room,

Jon
09-28-2006, 01:37 AM
JediRye... Is AMR or RuralMetro nearby? They've got LOTS of ambulances.

ffemt8978
09-28-2006, 01:38 AM
Riverboat casinos and day cruise ships might be another place to look.

Jon
09-28-2006, 01:50 AM
I work fulltime as a Security Officer / EMT at an investment firm's headquarters. We have a very low call volume (maybe 150 calls a year over 4 full-time EMT shifts). I like the job becase I get paid the same or more as I would to work transport, but there isn't any heavy lifting involved. Also, the advantage of doing QRS/First Response is that I just get to treat the patient and do a short chart... I don't have to transport, get tied up at the ED, and do a long chart.

My part-time job is with a large transport company doing "Special event" coverage. I get to see tradeshows, concerts, etc. from "behind the scenes." Several of our staff have been 'seconded' to the US government security types (secret service, etc) when the Vice President or Sec. State speaks at a convention in town. I've not done it yet, but would love to do it.

In short... there are many highlights to working in a non-traditional role as an EMT.

jedirye
09-28-2006, 03:30 AM
JediRye... Is AMR or RuralMetro nearby? They've got LOTS of ambulances.

Ironically, yes, AMR is like within 20 minutes away but I talked to a guy who worked there and he said they don't get a lot of emergency calls. I wouldn't mind it, but I want the job for some hardcore experience and I'm not sure that would cut it. I may apply though anyway; he said you get a sweet pager ^_^

-rye

Jon
09-28-2006, 09:12 PM
Rye,

Often, as a BLS provider starting out with an ambulance Co. such as AMR, you will spend lots of time doing 'transport' work. This isn't a totally bad thing. Lots of patient contacts, Lots of assesments, lots of patient lifting and moving experience, and lots of charts to write all help solidify your knowledge from EMT school. Yes, it is boring and dull, but it does give you some valuable experence for further jobs, and you also have your foot in the door if an "Emergency" spot opens up, etc.

As for the "sweet" pager... AMR probably issues them to everyone so that only YOU are resposible for it... so if it breaks, it probably comes out of your pay... If you share the pager with 30 other EMT's, you can often claim "I got it broken this morning" etc... Just some friendly advice ;)

Good luck.

Jon

Airwaygoddess
09-29-2006, 07:37 PM
Hospitals in their E.R.s Clinics will some times hire EMTs. I agree with Jon, Ba interfaculty transfers are a great way to get the basics mastered and learn about the different types of medical patients that are out there, and to get good people skills. And also if supervisers see you doing a good job on a basic transports, you will have a better chance on getting on a 911 rig.

HorseHauler
10-04-2006, 08:03 PM
I was working at the local race track (horse), thats another option

fm_emt
10-05-2006, 06:04 PM
I did the Six Flags thing in IL. It was a fun job, but you didnt see much in terms of skills, basically bandaid administration. I'd look into security, ER tech's (although most want IV experience), hospital security, stadiums (baseball/football) they might staff a first aid room,

Depends on the park. I have a friend that's an EMT at Great America here in Santa Clara, CA and they get all kinds of crazy calls. Plenty of bandaids, but quite a few cuts, joint injuries, diabetic issues, heat related issues, you name it. Sometimes the occasional fight breaks out, so there's a trauma here n' there.

And the EMS agency I work for handles one of the local stadiums. It's a lot of fun. :)

JJR512
10-07-2006, 10:55 AM
There is a Medeval Times near me, one of those restaurants with a central arena where they do jousting and stuff like that. If you've seen that movie "Cable Guy" with Jim Carrey and Mattew Broderick, you'll know what I'm talking about. I know all that combat is supposed to be carefully choreographed, so nobody should be getting injurred; still, I wonder if they have someone on hand all the time who's prepared to deal with an accident, and what level of training that person has.

Summit
10-07-2006, 12:10 PM
Ski Patrols
Wilderness guide programs/schools
Doctor's family practices (around here)

nyfd136
10-27-2008, 10:17 PM
In addition to theme parks (Water slides etc) you might consider the wonderful world of movies (contact the filmmakers to be put on their lists) and
music videos.
Stadiums and arenas are a great standby place. Only problem is most are contract work thru a paid service but if you are near one find out if the local volunteers are the back up. Free entry to event and usually get fed so not a bad few hours.

FF-EMT Diver
10-27-2008, 10:27 PM
If you want to run calls and get the experience I would imagie you wont find much at the zoo etc..., Also at these places you get a few minutes of Pt. contact but not a lot of real experience as when you get in the back of the truck and do a full workup assesment and reassesment, Altough you may ot run many 911 calls you can make transfers interesting if you really look into thier problems.

Flight-LP
10-28-2008, 04:21 AM
In addition to theme parks (Water slides etc) you might consider the wonderful world of movies (contact the filmmakers to be put on their lists) and
music videos.
Stadiums and arenas are a great standby place. Only problem is most are contract work thru a paid service but if you are near one find out if the local volunteers are the back up. Free entry to event and usually get fed so not a bad few hours.

Everyone clear??? ***SHOCK***. We have a pulse, thread resuscitated.................

Seriously though, dream on about working in Tinsletown. Those positions are few and far between. You really have to sell yourself to even get in the door........................

Why on earth would you want to work a public event and not get paid? Free admission means nothing, you aren't there as a spectator, you are there to do a job. But, free food is always welcome. :)

Buzz
10-28-2008, 06:55 AM
Why on earth would you want to work a public event and not get paid? Free admission means nothing, you aren't there as a spectator, you are there to do a job. But, free food is always welcome. :)

Depends on the event, but the last one I worked, my partner and I were getting quite a bit of female attention just walking around in uniform... I was getting paid to be there, but I'd have done it for free. Plus, I got to see some cool cars.

Flight-LP
10-28-2008, 07:42 AM
Depends on the event, but the last one I worked, my partner and I were getting quite a bit of female attention just walking around in uniform... I was getting paid to be there, but I'd have done it for free. Plus, I got to see some cool cars.

I'm happy you had were able to experience that personal ego boost. I'm sure in your manager's eyes that was the priority.........................*hint of sarcasm*

Ridryder911
10-28-2008, 07:55 AM
Okay are we having a marathon on raising dead posts? .. By the way you can also get a job a McDonald's, Burger King, and Wal-Mart .. that is where I see many EMT's go after graduating.

R/r 911

HotelCo
10-28-2008, 08:18 AM
Malls around your area might hire you to be their first responder.

FF-EMT Diver
10-28-2008, 09:42 AM
HAHA HAHA, I did not even look at the date, when I posted.

jochi1543
10-28-2008, 04:05 PM
Hospital, industrial. I saw a job posting just recently for an EMT-P at a hospital to work with cardio rehab patients. Industrial is pretty boring, but the pay can often be above ambulance around these parts.

Oregon
10-28-2008, 06:25 PM
If you are not located in Hollywood but someplace where they do a lot of location filming, you could hook on with a production company. I recently had to pass on a film gig (EMT-B, $20 an hour) . AMR gets most of the contracts for that sort of thing around here, but the indy crews still make some extra bucks.
Also, the local convention center and expo center staff a first aid room for trade shows/dog shows/sportsmen's shows whatever. Not exciting, but semi-regular employment.

HotelCo
10-30-2008, 08:12 PM
So I was thinking. And places like Chuck E Cheese... and other childrens places probably wouldn't mind having an EMT around. Might not be working as an EMT there... but you could use your skills and just having that EMT cert might help you in getting a job... that's what I'm hoping anyway.

Ridryder911
10-30-2008, 08:30 PM
So I was thinking. And places like Chuck E Cheese... and other childrens places probably wouldn't mind having an EMT around. Might not be working as an EMT there... but you could use your skills and just having that EMT cert might help you in getting a job... that's what I'm hoping anyway.

Okay, not to be rude, but what does and why does a restaurant need an Emergency Medical Technician? What skills were you taught.. how to add additional Canadian Bacon and extra cheese?

I was just joking and being derogatory about McDonalds.. but talk about demeaning a profession!

If restaurant wants to know what to do.. give a simple choking and CPR course, much cheaper and more effective. One does not a health care professional to be on the premises for the "just in case". We have became too paranoid in our society.

R/r 911

HotelCo
10-30-2008, 09:19 PM
I'm just trying to give info on getting a job... i'm sure the EMT will put you above... If other places are like my town... it's hard to get a job ANYWHERE. Much less at an ambulance company or FD. Even the children's restaurants have fights, falls, bumps and bruises around here... so you can have a little work with it... but not much.

Perhaps it was a poor suggestion...

John E
10-30-2008, 11:44 PM
that people who want to work as Set Medics would get more work in SoCal than most other locales, there is work out there in other parts of the country for those who look for it.

It's not for everyone, you have to be willing to put aside some of the "Ricky Rescue" attitude and realise that you are a part of a group of people working to increase safety and promote better health on the set. If a Set Medic can help keep the talent or a key crew member working after an injury or illness, they could be saving a producer literally tens of thousands of dollars, the ones I work for know that and they show their appreciation in my day rate.

As for some of the other advise I've read here, there's no "film company lists" that I'm aware of. There is a union, IATSE 767, First Aid Providers. It consists of EMT's, Paramedics, RN's, MD's, Rescue Divers, etc. Union work is the hardest to come by and ironically it doesn't pay as well as what I primarily do which is work on commercial productions. You've have to be willing to start on low or non-existent budget films to make the contacts with producers and production coordinators who do the actual hiring in the industry.

I don't want to sound insensitive or arrogant but $20.00/hour is at the very low end of the pay scale. Of course you have to provide your own equipment but if you're willing to work hard and do a good job, there are people making a 6 figure income working as Set Medics in the film industry. To keep that in perspective, I worked on a car commercial earlier this year for 4 days, the talent budget for that job alone, according to a source in the production company was $2,000,000.00.

Another avenue is event coverage, not as an ambulance attendant standing by, the only people making any money at that are the ones that own the ambulances, but working for the venue and providing first aid for employees and attendees at concerts and similiar events. Starting pay for that is around $20.00 per hour. Again, it's not like working on an ambulance. I'm sure that most folks here look down on event and Set medics, that's fine.

I would also look at things like CPR instructing, health fair screenings. If someone out there has an enterprising streak, start a company providing EMS care for youth sports events. Parents will pay a lot if it means that their kids are safer and are gonna get prompt treatment if there's an accident on the field.

And if all else fails, teach the thousands of new EMTs who think that they're gonna make a career at a job paying minimum wages...

John E.